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Fatal attachment: How pathogenic bacteria hang on to mucosa and avoid exfoliation




Mucous surfaces in the nose, throat, lungs, intestine, and genital tract are points of first contact for many pathogens. As a defensive strategy, most animals (and humans) can rapidly exfoliate these surfaces (i.e., shed the surface layer) to get rid of any attached attackers.




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Fatal attachment: How pathogenic bacteria hang on to mucosa and avoid exfoliation

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