Swimming bacteria, sperm increase speed through ‘corridors’ of low viscosity fluid

New research findings are yielding insights into the physics behind the swimming behavior of bacteria and spermatozoa that could lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms affecting fertility and formation of bacterial biofilms that foul everything from implantable medical devices to industrial pipes.

Read this article:
Swimming bacteria, sperm increase speed through ‘corridors’ of low viscosity fluid


About The Author

Ibrar Ayyub

Ibrar Ayyub is an experienced technical writer with a Master's degree in computer science from BZU Multan University. He has written for various industries, mainly home automation, and engineering. He has a clear and simple writing style and is skilled in using infographics and diagrams. He is a great researcher and is able to present information in a well-organized and logical manner.

Follow Us:
LinkedinTwitter
Scroll to Top